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Jelly Rollers

Genre: Blues , Roots Rock

IN THE BEGINNING, there was the blues. Jake-legged, hurt-fed and liquored-up, the music crawled gimpy and beat and beautiful out of the deltas and valleys and dusty byways of the American continent, crooning a seminal lament that, like a wolf to prey, went straight for the guts of love, longing and all that time takes away. Without the blues, there is no nothing—no jazz, no hip hop, no pop, no rock-‘n’-roll. It’s the foundation for everything. This, then, is the tradition mined and then moved forward by Seattle outfit the Jelly Rollers, an agglomeration of talented musicians who, for the past 15 years or so, have been steadily building a body of work that is both achingly old-timey and somehow new, fresh, of-the moment. And yet, the band makes this history and this tradition and this music its own, by daring to take it seriously and to play it as though life depended on it.

At the heart of the Jelly Rollers are guitarist/singer/songwriter Darren Loucas and singer/harp man Sean Divine, a pair of Miami natives who started playing together in 1993—creating a rough-hewn blues sound smack in the middle of the sub-pop world culture explosion. Loucas—whose playing is heavily influenced by the early bluesmen by way of ‘60s and ‘70s big rock acts like Led Zeppelin, the Who and Taj Majal—combines technical virtuosity with the deep, from-the-heart sentiment that elevates a certain few guitarists above the ever-growing herd. Divine’s harp work twines perfectly with Loucas’ guitar sounds, bobbing and chugging and weaving with bent notes and sustained howls of train-whistle heartbreak, and his voice has an alluringly rich and throaty quality; it is the voice of the blues—nostalgic and haunting. The rhythm section, comprised of drummer Eric Eagle and bassist Rebecca Young make up the last piece of the puzzle. Electrified and loaded for bear, this crackerjack foursome (often joined by world renowned boogie-woogie piano player, Arthur Migliazza) continues to surprise and delight fans and newcomers with music that rocks, rolls, swings and swoons.

In 2001, The Stranger’s weekly entertainment section wrote that “the Jelly Rollers play Americana the old, good way—the way the horn-pricked devil with his moonshine and dotted lines meant it to go... (they) sing about trains, women and what it’s like to walk down the road feeling bad, and they do it so well and true and simply that it feels sort of timeless.” Whether raving up a version of Willie Dixon’s “Pretty Thing” or introducing an original number, the Rollers have that rare and special ability to evoke a total atmosphere—a sepia-toned feeling for a particular time and place that can consume the listener in a collage of emotions and associations. Slow and mournful, up-tempo and fiery, the band touches upon various eras in the history of blues and rock, doing honor to such artists as the great Robert Johnson, Lightning Hopkins, Cephas and Wiggins, and their namesake, Jellyroll Morton. And yet, the Jelly Rollers make tradition their own, owning it, and taking it in new directions—much as the Beatles and the Stones and other great bands siphoned the soul of early blues to forge the foundation of rock-‘n’-roll as we know it.  This daring, talented and innovative band continues to break new ground in a genre that is as old as the bear, this crackerjack foursome (often joined by world renowned boogie-woogie piano player, Arthur Migliazza) continues to surprise and delight fans and newcomers with music that rocks, rolls, swings and swoons.

In 2001, The Stranger’s weekly entertainment section wrote that “the Jelly Rollers play Americana the old, good way—the way the horn-pricked devil with his moonshine and dotted lines meant it to go... (they) sing about trains, women and what it’s like to walk down the road feeling bad, and they do it so well and true and simply that it feels sort of timeless.” Whether raving up a version of Willie Dixon’s “Pretty Thing” or introducing an original number, the Rollers have that rare and special ability to evoke a total atmosphere—a sepia-toned feeling for a particular time and place that can consume the listener in a collage of emotions and associations. Slow and mournful, up-tempo and fiery, the band touches upon various eras in the history of blues and rock, doing honor to such artists as the great Robert Johnson, Lightning Hopkins, Cephas and Wiggins, and their namesake, Jellyroll Morton. And yet, the Jelly Rollers make tradition their own, owning it, and taking it in new directions—much as the Beatles and the Stones and other great bands siphoned the soul of early blues to forge the foundation of rock-‘n’-roll as we know it.  This daring, talented and innovative band continues to break new ground in a genre that is as old as the hills. 

https://myspace.com/jellyrollers/music/songs

Joe Doria Trio

Genre: Funk , Jazz , Organist

  1. Friday, May 15 9:00 PM (21+)

NW raised Joe Doria has been composing and performing on Hammond Organ, piano, and varied vintage keys/synths since the 90’s. Steeped in Hammond tradition studying the giants of the instrument he also never limits himself to one style and can be seen working with new projects often. Featured in numerous bands and CD’s, audiences are dazed with his ability to comp both the bass lines and the chordal structure of a song, while at the same time adding depth and dimension to every song he performs. At home and in touch with the Hammond, knowing the instrument and it’s history so well as to make it sing in any situation.

Joe Doria Trio

Genre: Funk , Jazz , Organist

  1. Friday, June 19 9:00 PM (21+)

NW raised Joe Doria has been composing and performing on Hammond Organ, piano, and varied vintage keys/synths since the 90’s. Steeped in Hammond tradition studying the giants of the instrument he also never limits himself to one style and can be seen working with new projects often. Featured in numerous bands and CD’s, audiences are dazed with his ability to comp both the bass lines and the chordal structure of a song, while at the same time adding depth and dimension to every song he performs. At home and in touch with the Hammond, knowing the instrument and it’s history so well as to make it sing in any situation.

Joe Doria Trio

Genre: Funk , Jazz , Organist

  1. Friday, July 17 9:00 PM (21+)

NW raised Joe Doria has been composing and performing on Hammond Organ, piano, and varied vintage keys/synths since the 90’s. Steeped in Hammond tradition studying the giants of the instrument he also never limits himself to one style and can be seen working with new projects often. Featured in numerous bands and CD’s, audiences are dazed with his ability to comp both the bass lines and the chordal structure of a song, while at the same time adding depth and dimension to every song he performs. At home and in touch with the Hammond, knowing the instrument and it’s history so well as to make it sing in any situation.

Joe Driscoll & Sekou Kouyate

Genre: Funk , Hip Hop , Reggae

  1. Wednesday, May 27 7:30 PM (All ages)

"A boundary-trampling high-octane hybrid in which the lightning fast electrified licks of Kouyate are matched by the explosive energy of Driscoll's rapid fire rhyming.” - Songlines

"A gloriously accessible collision of styles. It's an unlikely collaboration that works, magnificently.” - The Guardian

The collaboration between a rapper/beatboxer/singer-songwriter from Syracuse, NY and an electrifying African kora sensation from Guinea pushes genre boundaries and earns raves across the globe. Joe Driscoll and Sekou Kouyate blend hip-hop, spoken word, funk, and soulful, accessible rock with Afrobeat, reggae and irresistible African grooves.

The well-worn and often overblown expression "music is a common language" has never been more apropos in the case of Joe Driscoll & Sekou Kouyate. US-born, England-based Driscoll speaks no French and Kouyate, who hails from the West African country of Guinea, little English. When they were brought together at the Nuit Metis (Mixed Night) festival in Marseille, France in 2010 and given a week to produce a concert, music was the only way they could communicate.

It turns out, they had a lot to "talk" about, and their first meeting sparked a collaboration that led to the formation of a band, the recording of an album, over 200 concert dates across Europe and rave reviews. Driscoll contributes the rapping, looping, beatboxing and songwriting talents he developed growing up in Syracuse and during his own successful recording career. Kouyate, already a phenomenon in African music circles, has blown minds and ears with his hypersonic electrified riffs on the kora, bringing the exalted West African harp into the 21st Century with use of distortion peddles, effects and previously-unimagined technical prowess. Together, Driscoll and Kouyate blend hip-hop, spoken word, funk, and soulful, accessible rock with Afrobeat, reggae and irrepressible African grooves.

Sekou Kouyate was raised in a respected and accomplished musical family in Conakry, Guinea. Trained in the ancient traditions of his instrument, it is his ability to transcend and build upon those traditions that has set him apart. In France, he is known as the 'Jimi Hendrix of the kora' because of his unique style of playing with various effects, in a variety of genres, and with an extreme intensity. Kouyate has toured the world over as a member of the Ba Cissoko band, comprised of his cousin and brothers.

Joe Driscoll, whom Cee-Lo Green labelled "the gangsta with an iron lung," has been touring steadily for years, spreading his unique fusion of folk and hip-hop. The modern day take on the one man band, he uses live looping to create soundscapes full of beatbox, guitar, harmonica, percussion, harmonica, and just about anything else he can make use of. Now living in Bristol, England, Driscoll has performed his ground breaking solo show at the famed Glastonbury Festival, Electric Picnic in Ireland, and hundreds of major stages worldwide.

By teaming up, Driscoll and Kouyate have created a sum that exceeds even the large whole of its individual parts. According to Driscoll, "We've been raised in very different cultures in so many ways, but we share a lot of the same interests musically. Sekou was raised in the African rhythm and traditions, yet has always had a passion for reggae, hip-hop. I'm kind of the other way around. At the heart of it, we both just make the noises we love; we listen to each other, and try to flow in harmony. I think we just bounced off each other in so many ways: rhythmically, melodically, with craftsmanship. Through this, we found we had a language between us and that philosophically we were on a lot of the same pages as well.”

With plans already in the works to record a follow-up album, Joe Driscoll and Sekou Kouyate have discovered that music speaks louder than words.

OFFICIAL WEBSITE: http://joeandsekou.com

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/joedriscollmusic

TWITTER: https://twitter.com/driscollmusic

INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/joeandsekou/

John Doe

Genre: Acoustic Rock , Singer-songwriter

  1. Friday, June 19 8:00 PM (All ages)

John Doe was born in 1977 when he arrived in Los Angeles. His previous life in Tennessee, Wisconsin & Baltimore was a great & fertile time but new music and social changes led him to events that created a life in art. He graduated from Antioch College in Baltimore in 1975, worked as a roofer, aluminum siding mechanic, and ran a poetry reading series. Ms. Meyers was his landlord in the rural black community of Simpsonville , MD.

John met Exene Cervenka at the Venice poetry workshop Nov 1976 and he started working with Billy Zoom around the same time. When DJ Bonebrake joined X in mid-1977 the line up was complete. They released six studio records, five or six singles and one live record from 1978-1993. Five of X’s records have been re-issued along with two compilations. The Unheard Music documents their lives and progress as a band from 1980-83. In 2009 the film was included in the Sundance UCLA Archive of greatest films of all time. They appeared several times on American Bandstand, Solid Gold and David Letterman. As one of the last original punk rock bands standing, they continue to tour. The day that X played a free noontime concert in Fullerton, CA, they caused Orange County’s greatest high school truancy rate to date.

http://www.theejohndoe.com/

John Gorka

Genre: Folk , Guitarist , Singer-songwriter

From New Jersey, John Gorka is a world-renowned singer-songwriter who got his start at a neighborhood coffeehouse in eastern Pennsylvania. Though small, Godfrey Daniels was and is one of the oldest and most venerable music institutions and has long been a hangout for music lovers and aspiring musicians. In the late 1970’s, John was one of these aspiring musicians. Although his academic coursework at Moravian College lay in Philosophy and History, music began to offer paramount enticements. Soon he found himself living in the club’s basement and acting as resident MC and sound man, encountering legendary folk troubadours like Canadian singer-songwriter Stan Rogers, Eric Andersen, Tom Paxton and Claudia Schmidt. Their brand of folk-inspired acoustic music inspired him, and before long he was performing his own songs – mostly as an opener for visiting acts. Soon he started traveling to New York City, where Jack Hardy’s legendary Fast Folk circle (a breeding ground for many a major singer-songwriter) became a powerful source of education and encouragement. Folk meccas like Texas’ Kerrville Folk Festival (where he won the New Folk Award in 1984) and Boston followed, and his stunningly soulful baritone voice and original songwriting began turning heads. Those who had at one time inspired him – Suzanne Vega, Bill Morrissey, Nanci Griffith, Christine Lavin, Shawn Colvin – had become his peers.

http://johngorka.com/

Johnny A

Genre: Guitarist


Lots of folks throw around the phrase “let the music do the talking,” but only a few have the fortitude to really do it – to just go out there and play, shunning flash, shrugging off image and reeling in the listener on the strength of the songs alone.

Johnny A. is that kind of performer. For the better part of three decades, the Massachusetts-based guitarist and bandleader has proven himself capable of generating heat at venues from working-class bars to international amphitheaters – and every sort of venue in between. And when the house lights are turned up, he’s just as adept at captivating serious students of the six-string with a virtuosity that earned him the rare honor of having his name placed on a signature Gibson® guitar.

“I want to create instrumental music and deliver it like a vocalist,” he says “You can be a great player, on any instrument, and people will take notice for a while...but what people really remember is someone who brings them a great melody.”

On Driven, his fourth outing as a solo performer – which is due for release this June -- Johnny serves up plenty of that, in more flavors than Baskin-Robbins and Ben and Jerry’s combined. From the Motown-inflected party-starter “C’Mon, C’mon” to the introspective “A Mask You Wear” (a song that’s flecked with subtle slide playing redolent of George Harrison’s vintage work), he paints vivid landscapes, scenes that create an emotional connection without words.

Nowhere is that more evident than on the album’s sole cover, a languid take on the Bee Gees’ “To Love Somebody,” which fuses the original’s mournful poignancy with a gentle jazziness – not to mention an underlying swing that’s all the more impressive when you consider that it, like the rest of Driven, is the product of a one-man band.

While Johnny has been a bandleader for most of his career, he opted to work alone on this outing. That meant playing all the album’s instruments himself, but it also meant producing and engineering the songs – which he recorded in a studio that he invested plenty of blood, sweat and tears in building.

“It was different, but it wasn’t all that difficult,” he says of going the solo route on this outing. “I started out as a drummer, so I knew what I was doing there, and I just built the songs on my own. I just visualized myself as the band – I could see myself playing everything, and doing it all at once.”

That take-no-prisoners attitude has been ingrained in Johnny A. since he first set foot on a stage, whether as leader of locally-acclaimed Boston acts like Hearts on Fire or in the company of acclaimed artists like J. Geils frontman Peter Wolf – whose band he anchored for more than seven years. It fully came to the fore in 1999, when he independently issued his first solo album, Sometime Tuesday Morning – a disc that eventually went on to sell 100,000 copies and spawn “Oh Yeah,” a single that topped the AAA charts (a feat no instrumental song had accomplished in more than a decade).

“When I was in my early bands, I sang, but when I was with [Peter Wolf], I came down with a really bad bronchial infection and never recovered my voice completely,” he says. “I made a conscious decision at that point to focus on instrumental music. I re-evaluated how I played, redefined my approach completely.”


That new approach won plenty of accolades from outlets like the Boston Phoenix, which dubbed him “a singular presence on the Boston rock and pop scene, winding jazz, blues, popular tunes, rock, and flourishes of psychedelic improvisation into a tight, passionate ball.” The success of Sometime Tuesday Morning led to a second release, Get Inside, which brought forth a radio hit in the form of the title track – and drew the folks at Gibson®, who approached Johnny to collaborate on a custom guitar, the second best selling signature model in the company’s illustrious line of instruments.

Ever the restless spirit, Johnny A. continues to glide across genres effortlessly, exploring elements of jazz, soul and even a bit of Chet Atkins-styled country on his instructional DVD Taste, Tone, Space, which was released in 2006.


That stylistic fluidity got front and center placement on Johnny’s 2010 release, the live CD-DVD package One November Night, which captures just such a riveting evening for posterity and proves that , in the words of Premiere Guitar Magazine, “ Johnny A.'s magic crosses over because, like [Bill] Frisell, he doesn't just play guitar - he plays music.” That year he earned a Blues Artist of the Year award at 2010’s Boston Music Awards.

The journeying continues on the appropriately-titled Driven, a veritable sonic travelogue that takes the listener from the mists of the hypnotic opener “Ghost” through the rough-hewn terrain of “The Arizona Man,” before fading out in the mysteriously lovely sepia tones of “Gone (Like a Sunset).”

“My goal was to make a really lyrical album that would stay with people, not an album that would make people think ‘wow, that guy’s a great guitarist,’” he says. “I’m not interested in blowing someone’s head off with my playing, or showing how I can shred. With my favorite guitarists, I always tried to put my finger on how I could pick them out of a crowd. You can have all the chops in the world and be voiceless – I always want to have a voice.”

http://johnnya.com/


Jonatha Brooke

Genre: Folk , Pop , Singer-songwriter

Jonatha Brooke has written folk/pop songs, made records and toured world-wide for over three decades. During her early years in Boston she released two albums on Elektra Records with band The Story, Grace in Gravity and The Angel in the House. In 1995, Jonatha released her first of two solo albums on MCA/Universal, Plumb, followed by Ten Cent Wings in 1997. In 1999 she started her own independent label, Bad Dog, and has since released six more albums. Her 2008 release, The Works, combined previously unheard, unpublished Woody Guthrie lyrics with her own music and arrangements. Recently, she's co-written songs with Katy Perry and The Courtyard Hounds for their current releases. Jonatha's also written for three Disney films, various television shows, and composed the theme song for Joss Whedon's Dollhouse.

http://jonathabrooke.com/

Joseph Arthur w/ Jill Sobule

Genre: Singer-songwriter

  1. Tuesday, June 02 7:30 PM (All ages)

When Lou Reed friend Bill Bentley, now working as an A&R director for Vanguard Records, read Joseph Arthur’s moving eulogy in American Songwriter magazine, he approached him to record an album of Lou Reed songs. “Bill told me, ‘Don’t overthink it,’” says Joseph. Arthur set himself up in his Brooklyn studio last December and proceeded to cut twelve of his favorites—using only acoustic guitar and bass, piano and vocals. “The only way I know to give new life to something as rich with life as Lou’s songs and recordings is to go about them in a completely different way. No drums or electricity.”

By stripping these songs down to their essence, Arthur allows us to hear Reed’s music and especially his lyrics, with brand-new ears, from the well-known (“Walk on the Wild Side,” “Heroin,” “Pale Blue Eyes,” “Satellite of Love” and the first song he attempted, “Coney Island Baby”) to the more obscure (Magic and Loss’ “Sword of Damocles,” Set the Twilight Reeling’s “NYC Man,” Lou Reed’s “Wild Child” and “Stephanie Says,” later reworked as Berlin’s “Caroline Says”).

“I put my soul into this record,” says Arthur. “It was like getting to hang out with Lou again, being inside his head.”

Indeed, Lou lets you listen to these songs as if you’ve never heard them before. “I only wish he was alive to have heard them,” says Arthur, who wrote in his remembrance, “I’m trying not to focus on the fact that I had him in my life; that I loved him, and he loved me, and not think about the lost opportunity to see him again. We can’t cross over and we can’t come back and those that go before us become one with the mystery of everything. Lou was always of that mystery.”

Lou Reed was not only one of Joseph Arthur’s musical inspirations, he was a good friend, and that “Family Love,” as the singer/songwriter/painter/designer describes the pair’s relationship, can be heard in Lou, his simultaneous eulogy and tribute to the man’s life. Reed was on hand at New York’s Club Fez back in 1996 when Arthur performed a live audition for Peter Gabriel, which earned him his initial deal as the first American artist signed to Gabriel’s Real World label. Afterward, the two went out to eat ice cream, and found themselves sitting next to Dolly Parton.

“He was always just true to himself and what he was,” admired Arthur, whose liner notes for the album states, despite his punk reputation, “Lou was lovable… Everyone I knew loved him, whether they knew him or not.”

Lou offers a glimpse behind the curtain, both homage and a way to breathe new life into Reed’s remarkably deep, but consistent, catalog for future generations to come. Lou works as a cohesive whole, even though the individual songs come from all periods in Reed’s career, from the Velvet Underground to his solo output.

The Akron, Ohio-born Arthur was a jazz fusion bassist when he first discovered the Velvet Underground in his late teens (“It was the perfect timing,” he recalls, since he had only begun singing himself), and forged an impressive solo career that began with 1997’s Big City Secrets, as the first American signed to Peter Gabriel’s Real World label, later joining Gabriel’s WOMAD tour in Europe. Two years later, the EP Vacancy, with an album cover he created and designed himself—as he did with most of his releases—earned a 2000 Grammy nomination for Best Recording Package.

Arthur released his sophomore album, Come to Where I’m From, produced by T Bone Burnett and Tchad Blake, in 2000, his last album for Real World before putting out the double album Redemption’s Son on Universal Music Group’s Enjoy Records in 2002. He followed with Our Shadows Will Remain on Vector Recordings, making the album in New Orleans, New York City, London and Prague, with string arrangements provided by the City of Prague Philharmonic. In 2006, Arthur started his own label, Lonely Astronaut Records, releasing a visual collection of his artworks in a book titled We Almost Made It, along with his fifth studio album, The Invisible Parade, recorded in Berlin and Los Angeles. His song, “In the Sun,” was covered by R.E.M.’s Michael Stipe and Coldplay’s Chris Martin for a digital Hurricane Katrina EP sold on iTunes, which included six different versions, one a remix by Justin Timberlake. A sixth album, Let’s Just Be, came out in 2007, followed by Temporary People in 2008, both recorded with his back-up band the Lonely Astronauts.

Arthur was also a member of two super groups, including Fistful of Mercy with Ben Harper and Dhani Harrison, releasing the album As I Call You Down in 2010, also collaborating with Pearl Jam’s Jeff Ament in the band RNDM. He released three solo albums over the past three years: The Graduation Ceremony, The double-CD Redemption City and last year’s The Ballad of Boogie Christ, which he successfully financed through online crowd-funding site, Pledge Music.

http://www.josepharthur.com/

Jill Sobule is a Denver-born singer, songwriter, storyteller, guitarist and gypsy.  Over seven albums and nearly two decades of recording, Jill has mused on topics such as the death penalty, anorexia, shoplifting, reproduction, the French resistance movement, adolescence and the Christian right.

Her recording career began in 1990 with her debut album Things Here are Different, recorded by Todd Rundgren. Her 1995 self-titled album, Jill Sobule, yielded the hit songs I Kissed A Girl (the original) and Supermodel. Since then, she has continued to record, produce and tour with an ever-growing loyal fan base. Jill is considered a pioneer in crowd sourcing, with her 2009 fan-funded record, California Years. She continues to be at the forefront of exploring and creating new models for artists in an ever-changing changing music industry.  

She’s performed with Neil Young, Billy Bragg, Steve Earle, Cyndi Lauper, Tom Morello and Warren Zevon and inducted Neil Diamond into the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame. She can be seen live as a solo performer as well as the co-star of the Jill & Julia Show, an unusual and mesmerizing combination of song and storytelling in collaboration with comedian/actress Julia Sweeney. She also served as songwriter/composer for the hit Nickelodeon network show Unfabulous during that show's three-season run. She composed the music for the off-Broadway show Prozak and Platypus and her songs have appeared in a multitude of films including Mind the Gap, in which Jill herself co-starred.  She has been a political troubadour for NPR stations across America and most recently performed original music at the keynote session for Netroots Nation. Jill is a longtime participant as well as musical contributor at TED. 

A veritable gypsy, Jill divides her time between a busy touring schedule and a variety of other projects. The recently released A Day at the Pass finally captures an ongoing collaboration between Jill and John Doe (from the iconic punk band X) and was recorded live at The Pass studio on one fine day in Los Angeles. She is currently recording her next record, Dottie’s Charm’s - a collaboration between her and 11 of her favorite authors, including: Rick Moody, David Hajdu and Jonathon Lathem, Jill is also working with Steve Cossin (The Civillians), Jim Lewis (FELA) and Robin Eaton (a longtime collaborator) on the musical, Times Square.

In the words of New York Times pop music critic Jon Pareles, “Jill Sobule can claim her place among the stellar New York singer-songwriters of the last decade. Topical, funny and more than a little poignant...grown-up music for an adolescent age.”

http://jillsobule.com/

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Triple Door

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Seattle, WA 98101
Tickets 206.838.4333